Difference between revisions of "Vinnie Colaiuta"

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Vinnie Colaiuta is an American drummer, who played most of the tracks on "Secrets". Additionally, he appeared with Allan on the album "Blue Tav" by [[Steve Tavaglione]].
 
Vinnie Colaiuta is an American drummer, who played most of the tracks on "Secrets". Additionally, he appeared with Allan on the album "Blue Tav" by [[Steve Tavaglione]].
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==[[A Different View (Modern Drummer 1996)]]==
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RF: How about Vinnie Colaiuta?
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AH: He's like Gary in that he's always great for a laugh. I just look at the guy and I have to crack up. Vinnie played on all but one track on my Secrets album, and we also played live together in 1988. As far as drumming goes, he's absolutely insane. He's probably the greatest drummer alive. There's nothing you can say. I definitely want to play with Vinnie again.
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==[[Guitarist's Guitarist (Jazz Times 1989)]]==
 
==[[Guitarist's Guitarist (Jazz Times 1989)]]==

Latest revision as of 07:11, 13 February 2020

Vinnie Colaiuta is an American drummer, who played most of the tracks on "Secrets". Additionally, he appeared with Allan on the album "Blue Tav" by Steve Tavaglione.

A Different View (Modern Drummer 1996)

RF: How about Vinnie Colaiuta?

AH: He's like Gary in that he's always great for a laugh. I just look at the guy and I have to crack up. Vinnie played on all but one track on my Secrets album, and we also played live together in 1988. As far as drumming goes, he's absolutely insane. He's probably the greatest drummer alive. There's nothing you can say. I definitely want to play with Vinnie again.


Guitarist's Guitarist (Jazz Times 1989)

With or without large label interest in his career, Holdsworth is moving forward enthusiastically. He is particularly excited about the new album. Secrets, which features L.A. All Star drummer Vinnie Colaiuto [sic] on drums, Jimmy Johnson, his regular bassist, Steve Hunt (a drummer playing keyboards on Maid Marion his own piece), with Chad Wackerman (his regular drummer) also playin on one of the tracks.

Jimmy Johnson’s Bass Concept (Guitar World 1989)

The Holdsworth band’s loose structure and erratic work agenda often dictates that such drummers as Wackerman, Gary Husband and Vinnie Colaiuta juggle the sticks amongst themselves to suit their own hectic recording schedules. Because Johnson remains a constant factor in the equation (he’s managed to keep gigs that allow him to sub out when Allan needs him), he’s developed a responsive sense for the music no matter which direction it’s being pulled Between Chad’s sharp, kinetic attack, Husband’s lush, active approach and Colaiuta’s remarkable hybrid of the two, the bassist truly has his job cut out for him.

The Unreachable Star (Guitar World 1989)

Allan is laughing in disbelief at how good Vinnie Colaiuta’s drum performance is. This one sounds like a throwback to the Bruford days.

The drummer’s voice crackles wearily through the intercom. I’m really having trouble capturing the essence here."

"Well, you’re not getting any help from the big boy in here," Allan responds encouragingly. "Maybe we should just bail on it as a lame tune."

The intercom sounds pained. "Come on! Let’s just get it one more time!

Okay; laughs Holdsworth. Let’s get it, steeds!

GW: Not necessarily, although in the van you did say you really had to pull some stuff out from beyond to solo over the stuff the chaps recorded the other day. I assumed you were speaking metaphorically.

HOLDSWORTH: Well, I tried to, because the rest of the guys just played so great. I mean, they always do, but this time particularly I think the tracks that we ‘got are just great - Vinnie and Jimmy were just reaming on it, and I couldn’t just putsy around on top of them.

Allan Holdsworth’s Untold Secrets + Worthy Quotes (Guitar Player 1990)

But Allan is far too judicious to squander time on one element in the picture he wanted to present with Secrets, which is why he chose to mix the tracks at home, away from the financial demands of a studio schedule and the distractions of travel and industry. But this kind of music lives for the bandstand, and he was called away from the console for short tours that waylaid the project even further. "We did a tour with Vinnie Colaiuta and Jimmy that was just wonderful," he reports, "and in the same tour played with [drummer] Chad and [bassist] Bob Wackerman, and that was wonderful. Then we did a trip to Japan with [drummer] Gary Husband and Jimmy, which was amazing. I’m so stoked to be playing with these guys. As far as I know, they’re probably all saying, ‘Give me the guitar.’ In fact, I tell them that every time: I say, ‘Man, the only thing wrong with this band is the guitar player. There’s probably a lot of people who would agree with that, and I’m with ‘em. They played so great on the alb um, and it makes me feel particularly good, knowing I gave them the kind of freedom I would enjoy."

He’s right on the first and last accounts. This band - drummers Colaiuta, Husband, or Wackerman, Johnson, and keyboardist Steve Hunt - is one of the most vital rotating units in electric jazz, and their breathtaking performances stand tall in Allan’s crystalline production. From the rich ambience of the drums and Johnson’s 5-st’ring Alembic all the way down to the Spaten Franziskaner ale Allan pours as a spirited coda to "City Nights," Secrets is a rich, deep collection of adventurous music that features some of the guitarist’s most dramatic electric work, and some of the most expressive guitar-synthesis to be encountered anywhere.